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Arch of Titus (Arco di Tito)
Arch of Titus (Arco di Tito)

Arch of Titus (Arco di Tito)

Free admission
Via Sacra, Rome, Italy

The Basics

The Arch of Titus stands over Via Sacra on the southeastern end of the Roman Forum and depicts the victories of Vespasian and Titus in Jerusalem, in particular the plundering of the city’s great temple. The white-marble arch is covered in intricate reliefs and is best visited with a guide who can help you interpret these and other important ruins in the Roman Forum.

Join an ancient Rome tour to visit Rome’s most famous archaeological site and the Palatine Hill, along with skip-the-line access to the adjacent Colosseum. If you are traveling with children, opt for a family-friendly tour that makes these ancient sites more engaging.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Arch of Titus is located in the outdoor Roman Forum archaeological site, so wear a hat, sunscreen, and comfortable shoes when visiting.

  • The Roman Forum is accessible to wheelchair users via an elevator at the entrance, though only a portion of the remains is easy to navigate with a wheelchair.

  • The ruins in the Forum are a must-see for Roman history enthusiasts and can be fun for kids when visited with a family-friendly guide.

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How to Get There

The Arch of Titus is located at the Roman Forum, alongside the Colosseum and Palatine Hill in the center of Rome near the Colosseo station on metro line B.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

The ruins at the Roman Forum are outdoors, so visit in early morning or late afternoon in summer to avoid the midday heat and crowds, and on clear days if visiting in winter. The archaeological site tends to be less crowded midweek than on weekends.

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The Plundering of the Temple of Jerusalem on the Arch

One of the most important reliefs on the Arch of Titus depicts the plundering of the Temple of Jerusalem on the south panel. Spoils include a menorah, the shape of which was the inspiration for Israel’s official state emblem; silver trumpets; fire pans for clearing the ashes from the temple’s altar; and the table of shewbread where unleavened loaves were left in offering.

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