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Museum of Mediterranean Weaving (Museo dell'Intreccio Mediterraneo)
Museum of Mediterranean Weaving (Museo dell'Intreccio Mediterraneo)

Museum of Mediterranean Weaving (Museo dell'Intreccio Mediterraneo)

Via Guglielmo Marconi, Castelsardo SS, 07031

The Basics

The Museum of Mediterranean Weaving is housed in Castelsardo’s medieval Doria Castle. Eleven halls of exhibits illustrate the ancient craft of basket making and weaving. Learn about Sardinia’s unique spiral technique and the role of basket making in the local fishing industry and in religious traditions, and see how this craft has changed over time. Book tickets in advance so you can skip the line at the entrance and dedicate more time to the exhibits. You can also visit the museum as part of a day trip that covers both Castelsardo and the nearby Roman ruins of Tempio Pausania.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Basket making and other artisan crafts continue to be an important part of Castelsardo’s history and culture, and the town is an excellent spot to shop for Sardinian souvenirs.

  • Castelsardo has a lovely beach at the foot of the medieval town center, so pack your suit to take a swim before or after touring the museum.

  • The museum is accessible to wheelchair users.

  • It takes less than an hour to visit the museum, leaving you ample time to stroll through the picturesque town.

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How to Get There

The Museum of Mediterranean Weaving is located inside the 12th-century Doria Castle, above the historic center of Castelsardo on the northwestern coast of Sardinia. Public transportation can be tricky, so drive or join a guided tour that includes transportation to the town.

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When to Get There

The museum stays open year-round. Sardinia’s midday temperatures can be scorching in summer, so a visit during the hottest hours of the day can be a welcome respite from the heat.

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Doria Castle (Castello dei Doria)

The museum is set inside the Doria Castle, a fortress believed to have been built in the 1100s by the powerful Ligurian Doria family and originally called Castelgenovese. The castle predates the town itself, which is named for this medieval stronghold; it is still the most striking historic landmark on the promontory today.

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